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Behavioral Science

GENERAL

EDUCATION

RESEARCH

Links

Courses

BSC BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

BSC 331 BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN HEALTH AND DISEASE. (3)

The study of human behavior relating to health and disease and the organization of health
care as a social system. Selected concepts from the psychological and social sciences are
presented in a biobehavioral frame of reference and applied to the consideration of specific
problems.

BSC 626 SURVEY OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY. (2)

A survey of the field of health psychology. It will explore the ways in which social and psychological research contribute to an understanding of health and illness behavior. Prereq: Graduate or professional standing and consent of instructor. (Same as PSY 626.)

BSC 731 METHODS AND TECHNOLOGIES
IN CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE. (3)

This overview course is designed to introduce the student to the major methods and
technologies of clinical and translational science. The course will consist of 14 presentations
followed by open discussion of the presentation and assigned readings by class members.
The location of classes may change based on the content of the lecture. Homework
assignments will provide experiential opportunities to work with the various methods and
technologies. Active participation by all members is expected. Each weekly presentation
is designed to provide a general overview of a method or technology commonly used in
clinical and translational science. Discussions are intended to integrate the information
across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Homework assignments are designed to provide
practical experience with the discussion topic. Prereq: Graduate standing. (Same as CPH
669.)

BSC 732 INTERDISCIPLINARY PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENT. (2)

This course is designed to orient students to leadership and teamwork processes involved
in clinical and translational research and to train students to function effectively in team
settings. Students will be assigned to multidisciplinary teams with a designated principal
investigator. Each team will be assigned to develop an integrated multidisciplinary grant
application to address an assigned clinical research topic. Students are expected to apply
their knowledge of effective scientific communication, responsible conduct of research, and
methods and technologies of clinical and translational science to the grant application. The
course will consist of four class periods. The first three classes will consist of an orientation
to communication and the role of leadership and teamwork in multidisciplinary clinical
and translational research. The final class period will be reserved for a teams organizational
meeting. Supplemental team meetings are optional. Each team member will be required
to complete an individual five-page research methods report that is integrated into a
multidisciplinary research application addressing a clinical research topic assigned to the
team under the direction of an assigned principal investigator. Prereq: Graduate standing.
(Same as CPH 670.)

BSC 733 SEMINAR IN CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE. (1)

This seminar course is designed to orient students to clinical and translational research
community and activities at the University of Kentucky and to incorporate a multidisciplinary
cooperative approach to clinical and translational research. Students are expected
to apply their knowledge of effective scientific communication, responsible conduct of
research, and methods and technologies of clinical and translational science to ongoing
discussions. The course will consist of seven evening seminars focusing on different topics
of clinical and translational research. Students will be required to present a description of
their research interests and activities during one seminar. Homework assignments will
require students to summarize the key elements of each seminar as related to clinical and
translational research and the relevance of these issues to their own research interests and
career plans. Active participation by all members is expected. Prereq: Graduate standing.
(Same as CPH 671.)

BSC 745 RESEARCH METHODS IN MEDICAL BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. (3)

This is an applied methods course which will review the various aspects of research and apply them to current medical behavioral studies. The different approaches used by the behavioral and clinical sciences will be reviewed and demonstrated. Prereq: Any methods courses required for a Ph.D. in the department major.

BSC 746 RESEARCH ETHICS AND DILEMMAS. (3)

This class will utilize case studies for debate, class participation, and papers to help students
gain skills to recognize and resolve research dilemmas. Objectives of this class include:
(1) understand basic elements of ethical dilemmas; (2) to understand basic ethical theories
and frameworks for solving ethical dilemmas; (3) to examine ethical dilemmas within a
behavioral or medical science research context; and, (4) to examine ways of eliminating
bias and promoting objectivity in a behavioral or medical science research context.

BSC 760 AGING, HEALTH AND DECISION MAKING. (3)

This is a doctoral level seminar that provides an overview of behavioral decisional theories
(e.g. rational choice, multiattribute utilities models, naturalistic decision-making,
ethnographic decision models, Janis and Mann’s conflict theory, information processing
theory, heuristic models, process tracing models, etc.) and examines research applications
of those theories to the health of older adults. Research focuses on decision made by
physicians, older adults, family caregivers and policy makers. A variety of applications
include such decision domains as preventative screening, retirement and financial planning,
other medical treatments, self-care, seeking medical care, institutionalization, end-of-life,
etc.

BSC 763 WOMEN’S TRAUMA AND MENTAL HEALTH. (3)

This course will examine the research on intimate partner violence, mental health, and
substance abuse among women. Clinical and legal interventions will also be discussed.
Although knowledge of at least basic statistics would be helpful, it is not required for this
class.

BSC 764 SEMINAR IN HEALTH INEQUITIES. (3)

This course is designed to critically examine undeniable inequities in the distribution of
morbidity and mortality. Students explore linkages between disease burdens and the social,
economic, and cultural contexts of our rapidly changing world by integrating local, national
and international perspectives from social and biomedical sciences. Prereq: Graduate studies
in the social sciences and permission of the instructor.

BSC 765 RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3)

(1) Advanced history and theory of medical anthropology; (2) research design, field work,
analysis of data in medical anthropology. Prereq: Consent of instructor. (Same as ANT
765.)

BSC 766 CONCEPTS IN MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY. (3)

A review of sociological concepts and methods which have been applied to the study of
health and medicine; the contributions of medical sociology to general sociological theory
and to concepts and research on health-related problems of society. Prereq: Consent of
instructor. (Same as SOC 766.)

BSC 770 PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES IN HEALTH AND AGING. (3)

This course will focus on psychosocial issues related to the physical health and functioning
of older adults. Topic areas include: theories of aging; age-appropriate research designs;
age-related cognitive personality, social and family changes which influence physical health;
health behavior and education of older adults; and selected chronic conditions, e.g.
Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, depression, diabetes and stroke.

BSC 772 TOPICAL SEMINAR IN MEDICAL BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. (1-3)

Advanced study of selected topics of current importance in medical behavioral science. May
be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

BSC 773 PSYCHOSOCIAL ONCOLOGY. (3)

This course will introduce the student to the field of psychosocial oncology. Historical and
recent developments in the application of behavioral science knowledge and methodology
to the understanding and treatment of cancer and the cancer patient will be examined. The
role of psychosocial factors in the etiology, prevention, and treatment of cancer will be
explored. Emphasis will be placed upon the interaction of biological, psychological, and
social factors throughout the course of cancer. Prereq: Graduate standing.

BSC 774 FOOD AND FOOD SECURITY IN A CHANGING WORLD. (3)

This cross-cultural seminar explores the biocultural interactions among food, human
biology, and the social, cultural, political and economic factors that shape food-related
behaviors and nutritional status of populations. Topics include the social role of food, food
beliefs and ideology, the political economy of malnutrition, development strategies and
food security, and methods in nutritional anthropology research. Readings and discussions
are research focused and approach issues from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Prereq:
ANT 601 or consent of instructor. (Same as ANT 774.)

BSC 776 SEMINAR IN DEPENDENCY BEHAVIOR. (3)

The course is designed to explore theories of dependency behavior by examining the concept
of dependency as it can be applied to the study of various phenomena including alcohol
use and abuse; dependence on other psychoactive substances; institutional dependency;
dependency in work settings; and poverty and welfare. Prereq: Consent of instructor. (Same
as ANT/PSY/SOC 776.)

BSC 777 SEMINAR IN MENTAL ILLNESS
CONCEPTS, RESEARCH AND POLICY. (3)

Advanced study of contemporary concepts of mental health and mental illness, and their
historical development; major forms of response to mental illness. Prereq: Consent of
instructor. (Same as SOC 777.)

BSC 779 BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN DEATH AND DYING. (3)

Behavioral concepts are examined which explain reactions of individuals, collectivities and
social institutions to the phenomenon of death. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

BSC 782 WOMEN’S HEALTH AND AGING. (3)

This class explores the issues related to health and well-being among older women. Using
a multidisciplinary approach that blends humanities, social and medical science and public
policy, the course examines social, economic and cultural contexts of chronic physical and
mental health. Prereq: Upper level/graduate class in social science. (Same as GRN 782.)

BSC 785 COMPARATIVE HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS. (3)

This seminar will focus on concepts, issues, and research pertaining to health care systems
in comparative perspective. It will deal with the following questions. (1) What are the core
analytical dimensions of a health care system? (2) How do health care systems connect with
the other institutional domains of a society, with its value-system, and with its major
cultural and historical trends? and (3) Within the health care system, how are the main
constituents of modern medicine related to each other? Prereq: Consent of instructor. (Same
as SOC 785.)

BSC 787 BIOBEHAVIORAL PERSPECTIVES ON
DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE AND DEPENDENCY. (3)

This seminar course is designed to survey major topics, concepts and issues pertinent to
the field of drug and alcohol abuse and dependence. The course will consist of 14 weekly
presentations by instructors followed by open discussion of the presentation and assigned
readings by class members. Active participation by all members is expected. Each weekly
presentation is designed to provide a general overview of the current state of knowledge
(e.g. theory, methods, ethics, review of classic and/or exemplary studies) in a given area
of drug and alcohol abuse and dependence research. Discussions are intended to integrate
the information across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Prereq: Graduate standing.

BSC 788 DRUG ABUSE: CONTEMPORARY THEORIES AND ISSUES. (3)

This course is designed to familiarize students with major concepts and current issues in
the field of substance abuse research.

BSC 790 RESEARCH IN MEDICAL BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. (1-6)

Individually directed research and reading in particular aspects of medical behavioral science
under the supervision of one or more members of the faculty. May be repeated to a maximum
of 12 hours. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

BSC 815 FIRST-YEAR ELECTIVE, BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. (1-3)

With the advice and approval of his or her faculty adviser, the first-year student may choose
approved electives offered by the Department of Behavioral Science. The intent is to provide
the student an opportunity for exploration and study in an area which supplements and/
or complements required course work in the first-year curriculum. Pass-fail only. Prereq:
Admission to first year, College of Medicine.

BSC 825 SECOND-YEAR ELECTIVE, BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. (1-4)

With the advice and approval of his or her faculty adviser, the second-year student may choose
approved electives offered by the Department of Behavioral Science. The intent is to provide
the student an opportunity for exploration and study in an area which supplements and/
or complements required course work in the second-year curriculum. Pass-fail only. Prereq:

Admission to second-year medical curriculum and approval of adviser.

CDE 814 PATIENTS, DENTISTS AND SOCIETY I. (1)

This course aims to orient the student to the place health and health professions play in
modern cultures. Recognition of their own social assumptions and values and those of
persons of different backgrounds is encouraged. Understanding, predicting, and changing
dental patient behavior from a social standpoint is emphasized. (Same as CDE 814.)

CDE 824 COMMUNICATION IN THE DENTAL HEALTH CARE SETTING

The purpose of this course is to improve the student’s ability to communicate with patients and the public in an empathetic and professional manner. Methods of building the patient-dentist relationship and employing behaviors conducive to providing optimal dental health care with different types of patients are examined. CDE 824 is a one-credit graded course.

MD 811 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL MEDICINE I

The goal of the Introduction to Clinical Medicine I course is to provide students with opportunities to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to practice patient-centered and evidenced-based care. Active learning approaches include experiential learning in clinical setting, training in communication and interviewing skills through practice with “actor” patients in small group and in laboratory settings and with real patients in clinical settings, and through self-directed learning. Course topic areas include Medical Humanities, Medical Ethics and Professionalism, Developmental Pediatrics, Geriatrics, Cultural and Social Aspects of Health Care, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Pain and Suffering, Grief and Loss, Addiction, Nutrition and Health Promotion, Adherence and Behavior Change, Stress and Illness, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PSTD). The MD811 course is 11 credit hours.

 

 

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Page last updated Monday, January 14, 2013